“Pride and Prejudice and Zombies” Hardly Diverted From The Original Text


 It is a truth universally known that no one can recreate a Jane Austen work.  I was disapointed that “Pride and Prejudice and Zombies” did not contain the Zombie horror contained in other Zombie novels, such as “World War Z.”  I expected this book to be much better than the prequel, and was surprised when it was not.  In “Dawn of the Dreadfuls,” Hockensmith masterfully merges the Bennet family and Zombies into an exciting tale.  Such was not the case here.  Although Grahme-Smith’s inclusion of Zombies into Austen’s tale was creative, he failed to devote much effort to those encounters, which created a story that was too similar to the original text. 

I was surprised when Zombies invaded a ball and the Bennet women easily kill them without much effort.  There was no back story as to how Zombies arrived in Netherfield, or how the women became skilled at killing Zombies.  (Although this information was contained in the prequel).  I was similarly disappointed with other Zombie encounters that happened in the book.  For example, rather than being caught in the rain and catching cold on her way to Bingley’s, Jane is attacked by Zombies.  While cleaver, the book didn’t elaborate on her attack.  The characters killed Zombies too easily, and each attack lacked the description Zombie fans crave.  I appreciated that the entire book had been rewritten to neatly condense the original plot and language into a more manageable read, but without a strong Zombie sub-plot the rewrite was not enough to change the book. 

I think people who really enjoyed this book, had perhaps not read it before.  Having read it several times, I wasn’t necessarily in the mood to just re-read it.  I had hoped for a story that would be more of a spin-off from the original work, which this was not.  I would only recommend this book to someone who really loves reading Jane Austen.

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